Clinical VS. On-Site

See if you agree that "on-site" drug testing specimen collection services make a lot sense, economically and otherwise:

  • Typical Clinic Collection Scenario
  • Typical "On-Site" Scenario
  • Employee must leave job-site and drive to clinic or hospital for their drug test. Employee therefore exposes employer to potential liability - both workers’ comp and civil liability - if he/she is in any accident on the way to/from clinic.
  • Employee does not have to leave company job-site. Employer’s exposure to any type liability potential (e.g., an automobile accident) during an on-site collection process is virtually nil.
  • Typical Clinic Collection Scenario
  • Typical "On-Site" Scenario
  • Employee-donor wastes time waiting and waiting at clinic. Clinic must always, of course, give first priority to sick or injured people. Your employee, therefore, is not only "low" priority, but might also get ill from exposure to others there who are ill, causing them to later take sick-time off from work.
  • Employee-donor is always on-site collector’s #1 priority. Employee continues working right up to minute they are notified of their on-site drug test. Your employee has "zero" exposure to sick people at a clinic or hospital. And, they have zero "wait-time" for the drug testing or collection process.
  • Typical Clinic Collection Scenario
  • Typical "On-Site" Scenario
  • For clinic or hospital visit, employee must be absent from workplace for 35-45 minutes and often, is gone 1- 2 hours- and often, is still on the employer's time-clock and payroll.
  • “On-site”, an employee can be tested in just 4 - 6 minutes, and can quickly return to job. Employee does not get backlogged on work; employer does not pay for "waiting" at clinic.
  • Typical Clinic Collection Scenario
  • Typical "On-Site" Scenario
  • Clinic and hospital personnel usually are not forensic drug-test specimen collection experts. (Collecting a urine specimen for a drug-test is NOT the same simple process as collecting a urine specimen for a routine health urinalysis.) Plus, clinic/hospital personnel are very often too busy. Therefore, they are not careful enough to ensure that specimen collection procedure and the vital Chain of Custody (that they might complete only very “occasionally” in the course of any given week) is done correctly and legally for drug testing purposes. If not performed correctly, a “positive” test result that cost an employee their job will not hold up in a Court of Law. Such "seemingly" simple oversights can subject the employer to possible "unlawful termination" proceedings and very serious financial liability consequences.
  • On-site specialists are forensic drug-test specimen collection experts. They are job-specific trained in "drug testing". Many clinic/personnel might do only 1-2 forensic drug-test specimen collections a week in the course of performing their multiple duties at their clinic or hospital. On the other hand, an “on-site” specialist might do 100-200 forensic drug-test specimen collections in any given week and thousands in the course of a year. The on-site Drug Test Technician (DTT) is far more experienced in performing forensic drug test collections correctly and correctly processing the critically important Chain of Custody form. This helps ensure that the drug test and specimen collection process is forensic- and that the results - negative or positive - are always legally defensible in a Court of Law.
  • Typical Clinic Collection Scenario
  • Typical "On-Site" Scenario
  • Other critical forensic procedures are often overlooked. Busy clinics don't always properly “secure” bathroom used for specimen collection (a violation of U.S. D.O.T. drug test procedure). When rushed, clinic personnel rarely check for clean fingernails or have donor wash hands. Busy clinics also often fail to detect the possession of specimen “adulterants”, especially by forgetting to prevent donors from taking coat, purse, or any type bag with them into the bathroom.
  • On-site collection specialists are expertly trained in all essential forensic procedures. They know that it is their job to follow forensic procedure exactly and always. They are also familiar with the various types of specimen “adulteration” and “substitution” techniques used by druggies. They know collection “avoidance” ploys that are commonly practiced by perennial drug-abusers and addicts who can and always will cheat on their drug test when given any chance to do so!